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Of Somewhat Southwestern Soup

(Quantities are kind of a judgement call, but for 3-5 people:)

Chicken broth, one box.
Chicken thighs, diced, roughly one per person, or one breast for two people or the chicken leftover from last night.
Can of black or navy beans, undrained, or a couple of cups of cooked black beans with their liquor.
Can of tomatoes, diced
Frozen corn, maybe a handful. Maybe two.
Fairly tough greens (spinach disintegrates), chopped fine, as many as you want.
Onions and garlic, dried or diced, a ridiculous amount.
Ground ancho pepper, about a tablespoon.
Cayenne pepper, about a half teaspoon.
Black pepper, about a half teaspoon.
Oregano, about a teaspoon.
Cumin, at least a tablespoon.
Salt, maybe, carefully.
Tortilla chips, or corn tortillas, or flour tortillas.

Combine everything but the tortillas/chips, simmer for an hour. Longer if you want.

Pour over tortillas/chips.
You can also add:
Grated cheese, on top of the tortilla chips.
Cilantro, diced, on the chips.
Green onions, on the chips.
Toasted cumin seeds, on the chips.
Ground chipotle pepper, if you want hotter smokier soup.
Cooked rice, instead of tortillas/chips.
Veggie broth instead of chicken and skip the meat.

There are lots of ways to make this fancier, but I tend to end up making it quickly, on impulse, usually because someone's sick or in pain or just out of cope.

This post was originally posted on Dreamwidth. where there are comment count unavailable comments. Comment here or there as you prefer.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sounds excellent ... and rather like the time I invented Burrito Soup, only to learn that I had reinvented Tortilla Soup.

My favorite way of making it fancier is to saute the veggies first, then bloom the spices (briefly saute, just till the smell becomes lovely, 30 sec or less), then dump the rest in.

My favorite shortcut is to use leftover salsa in place of tomatoes & spices. If the chix is raw, then simmer the chix in salsa, then dump in the rest.

The variations are many!
Thanks for posting this; I am looking for such things. I find that I can indeed afford to eat plants and such things even in winter if I am willing to cook.